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August 2021

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are wounds that can form on the feet of people with diabetes. Due to the combination of diabetic neuropathy and poor circulation that many people with diabetes experience, these wounds can often go undetected in their early stages and tend to heal slowly and poorly. The more severe the wound, and the longer it remains untreated, the more likely it is that there will be complications. Early detection and treatment of these wounds is crucial to the overall health of a person with diabetes. Daily visual inspections of your feet can be done at home as a preventive measure to check for any abnormalities or changes in the appearance of your feet. Take note of any cuts, scrapes, sores, discoloration, or strange sensations like pain, numbness, or tingling. If you notice anything unusual, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist as soon as possible.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Massimo Pietrantoni, DPM from Rochester Podiatry, LLP. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brighton and Greece of Rochester, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Your feet are made up of 26 bones. While any of these bones can be fractured, there are three foot bones in which stress fractures are particularly common. The metatarsal bones account for between 17% and 35% of all foot stress fractures. These bones are located near the front part of your foot and connect the toes to the midfoot. Metatarsal fractures are especially common among runners and dancers. The calcaneus or heel bone is the site of 21% to 28% of stress fractures. The navicular bone, which is located on the top of the foot, is also a common site of stress fractures. Stress fractures can worsen without treatment, causing pain, tenderness, swelling, bruising, and weakness that interferes with daily activities. If you suspect that you have broken a bone in your foot, please seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Stress fractures occur when there is a tiny crack within a bone. To learn more, contact Massimo Pietrantoni, DPM from Rochester Podiatry, LLP. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain free and on your feet.

How Are They Caused?

Stress fractures are the result of repetitive force being placed on the bone. Since the lower leg and feet often carry most of the body’s weight, stress fractures are likely to occur in these areas. If you rush into a new exercise, you are more likely to develop a stress fracture since you are starting too much, too soon.  Pain resulting from stress fractures may go unnoticed at first, however it may start to worsen over time.

Risk Factors

  • Gender – They are more commonly found in women compared to men.
  • Foot Problems – People with unusual arches in their feet are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Certain Sports – Dancers, gymnasts, tennis players, runners, and basketball players are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Lack of Nutrients – A lack of vitamin D and calcium may weaken the bones and make you more prone to stress fractures
  • Weak Bones – Osteoporosis can weaken the bones therefore resulting in stress fractures

Stress fractures do not always heal properly, so it is important that you seek help from a podiatrist if you suspect you may have one. Ignoring your stress fracture may cause it to worsen, and you may develop chronic pain as well as additional fractures.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brighton and Greece of Rochester, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

As the body ages, a variety of foot conditions are more likely to develop. For example, foot pads can thin out, nails can become brittle, skin and tissues may lose elasticity, arches can sag, and circulation problems can lead to foot conditions such as sores. Because of this, older adults should be mindful about taking good care of their feet to stay healthy, which in turn will help to avoid potentially dangerous conditions from developing. Shoes should be comfortable and fit well to avoid corns, bunions, and calluses. To avoid fungal infections, feet and toes should be kept clean and thoroughly dried. Moisturizer should be applied to keep skin supple and to avoid cracked heels from developing. Stretching the feet, walking, and elevating the feet can aid in keeping your blood flow. Toenails should be trimmed straight across and even with the tip of the toe. Older adults with diabetes should inspect their feet daily to detect any cut or abnormality that may develop into a wound. Regular check-ups with a podiatrist can also help older adults keep their feet and ankles in good shape.

Proper foot care is something many older adults forget to consider. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Massimo Pietrantoni, DPM from Rochester Podiatry, LLP. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

The Elderly and Their Feet

As we age we start to notice many changes in our body, but the elder population may not notice them right away. Medical conditions may prevent the elderly to take notice of their foot health right away. Poor vision is a lead contributor to not taking action for the elderly.

Common Conditions 

  • Neuropathy – can reduce feeling in the feet and can hide many life-threatening medical conditions.
  • Reduced flexibility – prevents the ability of proper toenail trimming, and foot cleaning. If left untreated, it may lead to further medical issues.
  • Foot sores – amongst the older population can be serious before they are discovered. Some of the problematic conditions they may face are:
  • Gouging toenails affecting nearby toe
  • Shoes that don’t fit properly
  • Pressure sores
  • Loss of circulation in legs & feet
  • Edema & swelling of feet and ankles

Susceptible Infections

Diabetes and poor circulation can cause general loss of sensitivity over the years, turning a simple cut into a serious issue.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brighton and Greece of Rochester, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Taking Care of Elderly Feet
Saturday, 14 August 2021 00:00

Are You Suffering From Ingrown Toenails?

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can affect any part of the body, and it often affects the small joints of the feet. In fact, over 90% of people with RA experience foot and ankle symptoms. The inflammation caused by RA leads to damage of the ligaments and tissues that support your bones. This can cause the ankle and back of the foot to move out of alignment, leading to pain and difficulty while trying to move the foot. The middle of the foot can flatten due to deterioration of the ligaments and cartilages that create the arch. Bunions, claw toes, corns, and calluses are also common among people with RA, as a collapsed arch and joint damage in the toes can gradually change the shape of the feet. If you have RA, it is suggested that you regularly see a podiatrist who can help you maintain your foot health.

Because RA affects more than just your joints, including the joints in your feet and ankles, it is important to seek early diagnosis from your podiatrist if you feel like the pain in your feet might be caused by RA. For more information, contact Massimo Pietrantoni, DPM of Rochester Podiatry, LLP. Our doctor will assist you with all of your podiatric concerns.

What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks the membranes surrounding the joints. Inflammation of the lining and eventually the destruction of the joint’s cartilage and bone occur, causing severe pain and immobility.

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Feet

Although RA usually attacks multiple bones and joints throughout the entire body, almost 90 percent of cases result in pain in the foot or ankle area.

Symptoms

  • Swelling and pain in the feet
  • Stiffness in the feet
  • Pain on the ball or sole of feet
  • Joint shift and deformation

Diagnosis

Quick diagnosis of RA in the feet is important so that the podiatrist can treat the area effectively. Your doctor will ask you about your medical history, occupation, and lifestyle to determine the origin of the condition. Rheumatoid Factor tests help to determine if someone is affected by the disease.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brighton and Greece of Rochester, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Feet
Tuesday, 03 August 2021 00:00

What Does a Foot Wart Look Like?

Plantar warts are fleshy growths that can appear on the soles of the feet. They are caused by a strain of the human papillomavirus (HPV). Unlike warts that affect other parts of the body, plantar warts are typically flat and cause a buildup of the top layer of skin. These warts may grow inward as the body’s weight puts pressure on the soles of the feet, causing pain. Plantar warts can appear as a single wart or a constellation of multiple warts. They have a rough, grainy texture and small block dots in the middle. Plantar warts are contagious and can spread between individuals. Fortunately, there are a variety of treatments available. If you find a wart on the bottom of your foot, a podiatrist can help find the right treatment for you. 

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact Massimo Pietrantoni, DPM from Rochester Podiatry, LLP. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brighton and Greece of Rochester, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Warts
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